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Sautéed Mushrooms on Flatbread with Braised Greens

Sautéed Mushrooms on Flatbread with Braised Greens


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Two simple gestures deliver so much. Take a crispy flatbread (or cracker or even grilled bread) and top it with something...

Two simple gestures deliver so much. Take a crispy flatbread (or cracker or even grilled bread) and top it with something soft and garlicky, like sautéed mushrooms, then add greens like kale, spinach, or chard. I like to use cultivated hen-of-the-woods or maitake mushrooms for their texture.

V is for Vegetables recipes courtesy Little, Brown and Company Copyright © 2015 by Michael Anthony and Dorothy Kalins Ink, LLC

Ingredients

For the flatbread:

  • 3 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 1/4 Pound mushrooms, thickly sliced
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 pieces flatbread
  • 1/2 recipe Kale Cooked Quickly (see below)

For the Kale Cooked Quickly:

  • 4 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, smashed
  • 2 bunches kale, center ribs removed, leaves blanched and roughly chopped
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Fresh lemon juice, to taste

Sautéed Chicory Greens Southern Italian Style

Eating bitter chicory greens is an ancient tradition in the Italian cuisine, especially in the southern regions. For centuries people used to hand-pick the wild variety of this plant in the surrounding areas of their homes and cook it right away, sometimes sautéed and sometimes simply boiled. I can even recall that when I was a little girl, my grandmother used to go out in the rain during spring time to pick the freshest chicory she could find.

Today however, there is no need to hunt for chicory in the wild as it is becoming way more common to find this nutrient-packed vegetable also in the supermarkets. I can assure you that if you cook it properly, the taste is quite as good. In fact, raw chicory has a strong bitter and spicy flavour, but if you boil it for just a few minutes it becomes mild and delicious.

This recipe is a staple in my family and everyone loves it. Besides, it pairs the benefits of eating leafy vegetables with all the great distinctive ingredients used in the southern Italian cuisine like capers, anchovies in oil and chili flakes. And the best part? It takes just a few minutes to prepare.

As it has quite a powerful flavour, this side dish pairs perfectly with simple and healthy mains like grilled fish or steamed chicken. Moreover, it can also be reinvented as a great pasta sauce.

As a side note, if you like this recipe, but you cannot find chicory greens at your local grocery store, you can replace them with any kind of bitter leafy vegetable of your liking such as endive, escarole, radicchio or even dandelion leaves. In this case, however, I would suggest you to blanch the greens just for a few seconds instead of boiling them down or just skip boiling them altogether.


Sautéed Chicory Greens Southern Italian Style

Eating bitter chicory greens is an ancient tradition in the Italian cuisine, especially in the southern regions. For centuries people used to hand-pick the wild variety of this plant in the surrounding areas of their homes and cook it right away, sometimes sautéed and sometimes simply boiled. I can even recall that when I was a little girl, my grandmother used to go out in the rain during spring time to pick the freshest chicory she could find.

Today however, there is no need to hunt for chicory in the wild as it is becoming way more common to find this nutrient-packed vegetable also in the supermarkets. I can assure you that if you cook it properly, the taste is quite as good. In fact, raw chicory has a strong bitter and spicy flavour, but if you boil it for just a few minutes it becomes mild and delicious.

This recipe is a staple in my family and everyone loves it. Besides, it pairs the benefits of eating leafy vegetables with all the great distinctive ingredients used in the southern Italian cuisine like capers, anchovies in oil and chili flakes. And the best part? It takes just a few minutes to prepare.

As it has quite a powerful flavour, this side dish pairs perfectly with simple and healthy mains like grilled fish or steamed chicken. Moreover, it can also be reinvented as a great pasta sauce.

As a side note, if you like this recipe, but you cannot find chicory greens at your local grocery store, you can replace them with any kind of bitter leafy vegetable of your liking such as endive, escarole, radicchio or even dandelion leaves. In this case, however, I would suggest you to blanch the greens just for a few seconds instead of boiling them down or just skip boiling them altogether.


Sautéed Chicory Greens Southern Italian Style

Eating bitter chicory greens is an ancient tradition in the Italian cuisine, especially in the southern regions. For centuries people used to hand-pick the wild variety of this plant in the surrounding areas of their homes and cook it right away, sometimes sautéed and sometimes simply boiled. I can even recall that when I was a little girl, my grandmother used to go out in the rain during spring time to pick the freshest chicory she could find.

Today however, there is no need to hunt for chicory in the wild as it is becoming way more common to find this nutrient-packed vegetable also in the supermarkets. I can assure you that if you cook it properly, the taste is quite as good. In fact, raw chicory has a strong bitter and spicy flavour, but if you boil it for just a few minutes it becomes mild and delicious.

This recipe is a staple in my family and everyone loves it. Besides, it pairs the benefits of eating leafy vegetables with all the great distinctive ingredients used in the southern Italian cuisine like capers, anchovies in oil and chili flakes. And the best part? It takes just a few minutes to prepare.

As it has quite a powerful flavour, this side dish pairs perfectly with simple and healthy mains like grilled fish or steamed chicken. Moreover, it can also be reinvented as a great pasta sauce.

As a side note, if you like this recipe, but you cannot find chicory greens at your local grocery store, you can replace them with any kind of bitter leafy vegetable of your liking such as endive, escarole, radicchio or even dandelion leaves. In this case, however, I would suggest you to blanch the greens just for a few seconds instead of boiling them down or just skip boiling them altogether.


Sautéed Chicory Greens Southern Italian Style

Eating bitter chicory greens is an ancient tradition in the Italian cuisine, especially in the southern regions. For centuries people used to hand-pick the wild variety of this plant in the surrounding areas of their homes and cook it right away, sometimes sautéed and sometimes simply boiled. I can even recall that when I was a little girl, my grandmother used to go out in the rain during spring time to pick the freshest chicory she could find.

Today however, there is no need to hunt for chicory in the wild as it is becoming way more common to find this nutrient-packed vegetable also in the supermarkets. I can assure you that if you cook it properly, the taste is quite as good. In fact, raw chicory has a strong bitter and spicy flavour, but if you boil it for just a few minutes it becomes mild and delicious.

This recipe is a staple in my family and everyone loves it. Besides, it pairs the benefits of eating leafy vegetables with all the great distinctive ingredients used in the southern Italian cuisine like capers, anchovies in oil and chili flakes. And the best part? It takes just a few minutes to prepare.

As it has quite a powerful flavour, this side dish pairs perfectly with simple and healthy mains like grilled fish or steamed chicken. Moreover, it can also be reinvented as a great pasta sauce.

As a side note, if you like this recipe, but you cannot find chicory greens at your local grocery store, you can replace them with any kind of bitter leafy vegetable of your liking such as endive, escarole, radicchio or even dandelion leaves. In this case, however, I would suggest you to blanch the greens just for a few seconds instead of boiling them down or just skip boiling them altogether.


Sautéed Chicory Greens Southern Italian Style

Eating bitter chicory greens is an ancient tradition in the Italian cuisine, especially in the southern regions. For centuries people used to hand-pick the wild variety of this plant in the surrounding areas of their homes and cook it right away, sometimes sautéed and sometimes simply boiled. I can even recall that when I was a little girl, my grandmother used to go out in the rain during spring time to pick the freshest chicory she could find.

Today however, there is no need to hunt for chicory in the wild as it is becoming way more common to find this nutrient-packed vegetable also in the supermarkets. I can assure you that if you cook it properly, the taste is quite as good. In fact, raw chicory has a strong bitter and spicy flavour, but if you boil it for just a few minutes it becomes mild and delicious.

This recipe is a staple in my family and everyone loves it. Besides, it pairs the benefits of eating leafy vegetables with all the great distinctive ingredients used in the southern Italian cuisine like capers, anchovies in oil and chili flakes. And the best part? It takes just a few minutes to prepare.

As it has quite a powerful flavour, this side dish pairs perfectly with simple and healthy mains like grilled fish or steamed chicken. Moreover, it can also be reinvented as a great pasta sauce.

As a side note, if you like this recipe, but you cannot find chicory greens at your local grocery store, you can replace them with any kind of bitter leafy vegetable of your liking such as endive, escarole, radicchio or even dandelion leaves. In this case, however, I would suggest you to blanch the greens just for a few seconds instead of boiling them down or just skip boiling them altogether.


Sautéed Chicory Greens Southern Italian Style

Eating bitter chicory greens is an ancient tradition in the Italian cuisine, especially in the southern regions. For centuries people used to hand-pick the wild variety of this plant in the surrounding areas of their homes and cook it right away, sometimes sautéed and sometimes simply boiled. I can even recall that when I was a little girl, my grandmother used to go out in the rain during spring time to pick the freshest chicory she could find.

Today however, there is no need to hunt for chicory in the wild as it is becoming way more common to find this nutrient-packed vegetable also in the supermarkets. I can assure you that if you cook it properly, the taste is quite as good. In fact, raw chicory has a strong bitter and spicy flavour, but if you boil it for just a few minutes it becomes mild and delicious.

This recipe is a staple in my family and everyone loves it. Besides, it pairs the benefits of eating leafy vegetables with all the great distinctive ingredients used in the southern Italian cuisine like capers, anchovies in oil and chili flakes. And the best part? It takes just a few minutes to prepare.

As it has quite a powerful flavour, this side dish pairs perfectly with simple and healthy mains like grilled fish or steamed chicken. Moreover, it can also be reinvented as a great pasta sauce.

As a side note, if you like this recipe, but you cannot find chicory greens at your local grocery store, you can replace them with any kind of bitter leafy vegetable of your liking such as endive, escarole, radicchio or even dandelion leaves. In this case, however, I would suggest you to blanch the greens just for a few seconds instead of boiling them down or just skip boiling them altogether.


Sautéed Chicory Greens Southern Italian Style

Eating bitter chicory greens is an ancient tradition in the Italian cuisine, especially in the southern regions. For centuries people used to hand-pick the wild variety of this plant in the surrounding areas of their homes and cook it right away, sometimes sautéed and sometimes simply boiled. I can even recall that when I was a little girl, my grandmother used to go out in the rain during spring time to pick the freshest chicory she could find.

Today however, there is no need to hunt for chicory in the wild as it is becoming way more common to find this nutrient-packed vegetable also in the supermarkets. I can assure you that if you cook it properly, the taste is quite as good. In fact, raw chicory has a strong bitter and spicy flavour, but if you boil it for just a few minutes it becomes mild and delicious.

This recipe is a staple in my family and everyone loves it. Besides, it pairs the benefits of eating leafy vegetables with all the great distinctive ingredients used in the southern Italian cuisine like capers, anchovies in oil and chili flakes. And the best part? It takes just a few minutes to prepare.

As it has quite a powerful flavour, this side dish pairs perfectly with simple and healthy mains like grilled fish or steamed chicken. Moreover, it can also be reinvented as a great pasta sauce.

As a side note, if you like this recipe, but you cannot find chicory greens at your local grocery store, you can replace them with any kind of bitter leafy vegetable of your liking such as endive, escarole, radicchio or even dandelion leaves. In this case, however, I would suggest you to blanch the greens just for a few seconds instead of boiling them down or just skip boiling them altogether.


Sautéed Chicory Greens Southern Italian Style

Eating bitter chicory greens is an ancient tradition in the Italian cuisine, especially in the southern regions. For centuries people used to hand-pick the wild variety of this plant in the surrounding areas of their homes and cook it right away, sometimes sautéed and sometimes simply boiled. I can even recall that when I was a little girl, my grandmother used to go out in the rain during spring time to pick the freshest chicory she could find.

Today however, there is no need to hunt for chicory in the wild as it is becoming way more common to find this nutrient-packed vegetable also in the supermarkets. I can assure you that if you cook it properly, the taste is quite as good. In fact, raw chicory has a strong bitter and spicy flavour, but if you boil it for just a few minutes it becomes mild and delicious.

This recipe is a staple in my family and everyone loves it. Besides, it pairs the benefits of eating leafy vegetables with all the great distinctive ingredients used in the southern Italian cuisine like capers, anchovies in oil and chili flakes. And the best part? It takes just a few minutes to prepare.

As it has quite a powerful flavour, this side dish pairs perfectly with simple and healthy mains like grilled fish or steamed chicken. Moreover, it can also be reinvented as a great pasta sauce.

As a side note, if you like this recipe, but you cannot find chicory greens at your local grocery store, you can replace them with any kind of bitter leafy vegetable of your liking such as endive, escarole, radicchio or even dandelion leaves. In this case, however, I would suggest you to blanch the greens just for a few seconds instead of boiling them down or just skip boiling them altogether.


Sautéed Chicory Greens Southern Italian Style

Eating bitter chicory greens is an ancient tradition in the Italian cuisine, especially in the southern regions. For centuries people used to hand-pick the wild variety of this plant in the surrounding areas of their homes and cook it right away, sometimes sautéed and sometimes simply boiled. I can even recall that when I was a little girl, my grandmother used to go out in the rain during spring time to pick the freshest chicory she could find.

Today however, there is no need to hunt for chicory in the wild as it is becoming way more common to find this nutrient-packed vegetable also in the supermarkets. I can assure you that if you cook it properly, the taste is quite as good. In fact, raw chicory has a strong bitter and spicy flavour, but if you boil it for just a few minutes it becomes mild and delicious.

This recipe is a staple in my family and everyone loves it. Besides, it pairs the benefits of eating leafy vegetables with all the great distinctive ingredients used in the southern Italian cuisine like capers, anchovies in oil and chili flakes. And the best part? It takes just a few minutes to prepare.

As it has quite a powerful flavour, this side dish pairs perfectly with simple and healthy mains like grilled fish or steamed chicken. Moreover, it can also be reinvented as a great pasta sauce.

As a side note, if you like this recipe, but you cannot find chicory greens at your local grocery store, you can replace them with any kind of bitter leafy vegetable of your liking such as endive, escarole, radicchio or even dandelion leaves. In this case, however, I would suggest you to blanch the greens just for a few seconds instead of boiling them down or just skip boiling them altogether.


Sautéed Chicory Greens Southern Italian Style

Eating bitter chicory greens is an ancient tradition in the Italian cuisine, especially in the southern regions. For centuries people used to hand-pick the wild variety of this plant in the surrounding areas of their homes and cook it right away, sometimes sautéed and sometimes simply boiled. I can even recall that when I was a little girl, my grandmother used to go out in the rain during spring time to pick the freshest chicory she could find.

Today however, there is no need to hunt for chicory in the wild as it is becoming way more common to find this nutrient-packed vegetable also in the supermarkets. I can assure you that if you cook it properly, the taste is quite as good. In fact, raw chicory has a strong bitter and spicy flavour, but if you boil it for just a few minutes it becomes mild and delicious.

This recipe is a staple in my family and everyone loves it. Besides, it pairs the benefits of eating leafy vegetables with all the great distinctive ingredients used in the southern Italian cuisine like capers, anchovies in oil and chili flakes. And the best part? It takes just a few minutes to prepare.

As it has quite a powerful flavour, this side dish pairs perfectly with simple and healthy mains like grilled fish or steamed chicken. Moreover, it can also be reinvented as a great pasta sauce.

As a side note, if you like this recipe, but you cannot find chicory greens at your local grocery store, you can replace them with any kind of bitter leafy vegetable of your liking such as endive, escarole, radicchio or even dandelion leaves. In this case, however, I would suggest you to blanch the greens just for a few seconds instead of boiling them down or just skip boiling them altogether.