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Mardi Gras Survival Guide

Mardi Gras Survival Guide


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Translation: There is no way that you can make it out of this day alive. Or at least with your healthy reputation in tact. You don’t believe me? I ate two doughnuts just to prep for this article.

This festive green, purple, and gold holiday is the official marker of the beginning or Lent, the Christian time of fasting leading up to Easter. Consequently, the day before Lent became a huge event to overindulge on things that you are abstaining from over the next 40 days. Eventually, Mardi Gras, or Fat Tuesday, became an event celebrated around the world separate from the typical Christian origins. New Orleans being the leader in the colorful festivities.

Photo by Katherine Carroll

Now I can probably guarantee that most of us will not be venturing to Louisiana this Tuesday (raise your hand if you have a prelim), but I can assure you that you can have your share of fun to celebrate.

A lot of traditional fried foods are served to celebrate the holiday. My suggestion? Take a trip to Nasties. The pet name is more than just a term of endearment.

Photo by Katherine Carroll

However, the most well know Mardi Gras food is the King Cake. It is a large, ring shaped confection (similar to coffee cake) that is extremely rich in color and taste. For fun, a baby is usually placed somewhere inside of the cake, and the person who receives the baby is said to provide the cake for next year.

While that is all good and fun, I doubt that most of us will have time to make a King Cake to celebrate the day. Solution? Doughnuts.

Photo by Katherine Carroll

Doughnuts are basically a much smaller version of the King Cake and fortunately much more accessible for your typical college student. Which means you can have your cake and eat it too.

All in all, forget your healthy habits. Today is meant to be enjoyed so enjoy it to the fullest. Or in the very wise words of Marie Antoinette, “Let them eat cake.”

Happy Mardi Gras.

Photo by Katherine Carroll

The post Mardi Gras Survival Guide originally appeared on Spoon University. Please visit Spoon University to see more posts like this one.


The Ultimate Mardi Gras Guide

Mardi Gras means Fat Tuesday in French, and represents the season of Carnival celebration. Every year, Mardi Gras begins on Twelfth Night, which is January 6th. Twelfth Night represents the Christian holy day of the Epiphany. The season, which represents a time of celebration before Christian Lent, lasts until Fat Tuesday. The length of the Mardi Gras season varies, but it typically lasts anywhere from a month and a half to three months. For a list of future Mardi Gras Day dates, see here. For more information on Mardi Gras basics, see here.

The History of Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras originated in New Orleans the day Iberville stood on our land in 1699. Since then, balls have become a tradition of the season to represent members of society. From the past to the present, Mardi Gras is full of traditions.

Mardi Gras balls began in the 1700s and still exist today. At the Twelfth Night ball, a king cake as cut, and whoever found the bean (today it is a baby not a bean) inside would host the next ball. This would continue until Mardi Gras evening. Numerous balls still exist today, although they are often affiliated with various parades, organizations or krewes. The first ball was held in 1857 by the Mistick Krewe of Comus. Comus hosted the first parade, followed by Rex in 1872, which debuted the king of Mardi Gras. The Rex parade gave Mardi Gras the official colors of purple to represent justice, green to represent faith and gold to represent power. The three colors were to represent the “king”.

In 1872, the city of New Orleans was struggling through years of reconstruction. To help the city and promote tourism, proclamations of Mardi Gras were posted at train stations throughout the country. Rex commanded his subjects to gather and celebrate Carnaval in New Orleans. From there on, Mardi Gras became a sought after tourist attraction.

For more in depth information on Mardi Gras history and traditions, see here. You can visit many Mardi Gras museums year-round as well.

What is Lundi Gras?

Lundi Gras means Fat Monday in French. It is the day before Mardi Gras day. Some parades roll that night, including Proteus and Orpheus, while the day is often filled with festive lunches and celebrations, including the wonderfully creative Red Beans Parade. Zulu and Rex historically meet on this day as well and host various celebrations.


The Ultimate Mardi Gras Guide

Mardi Gras means Fat Tuesday in French, and represents the season of Carnival celebration. Every year, Mardi Gras begins on Twelfth Night, which is January 6th. Twelfth Night represents the Christian holy day of the Epiphany. The season, which represents a time of celebration before Christian Lent, lasts until Fat Tuesday. The length of the Mardi Gras season varies, but it typically lasts anywhere from a month and a half to three months. For a list of future Mardi Gras Day dates, see here. For more information on Mardi Gras basics, see here.

The History of Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras originated in New Orleans the day Iberville stood on our land in 1699. Since then, balls have become a tradition of the season to represent members of society. From the past to the present, Mardi Gras is full of traditions.

Mardi Gras balls began in the 1700s and still exist today. At the Twelfth Night ball, a king cake as cut, and whoever found the bean (today it is a baby not a bean) inside would host the next ball. This would continue until Mardi Gras evening. Numerous balls still exist today, although they are often affiliated with various parades, organizations or krewes. The first ball was held in 1857 by the Mistick Krewe of Comus. Comus hosted the first parade, followed by Rex in 1872, which debuted the king of Mardi Gras. The Rex parade gave Mardi Gras the official colors of purple to represent justice, green to represent faith and gold to represent power. The three colors were to represent the “king”.

In 1872, the city of New Orleans was struggling through years of reconstruction. To help the city and promote tourism, proclamations of Mardi Gras were posted at train stations throughout the country. Rex commanded his subjects to gather and celebrate Carnaval in New Orleans. From there on, Mardi Gras became a sought after tourist attraction.

For more in depth information on Mardi Gras history and traditions, see here. You can visit many Mardi Gras museums year-round as well.

What is Lundi Gras?

Lundi Gras means Fat Monday in French. It is the day before Mardi Gras day. Some parades roll that night, including Proteus and Orpheus, while the day is often filled with festive lunches and celebrations, including the wonderfully creative Red Beans Parade. Zulu and Rex historically meet on this day as well and host various celebrations.


The Ultimate Mardi Gras Guide

Mardi Gras means Fat Tuesday in French, and represents the season of Carnival celebration. Every year, Mardi Gras begins on Twelfth Night, which is January 6th. Twelfth Night represents the Christian holy day of the Epiphany. The season, which represents a time of celebration before Christian Lent, lasts until Fat Tuesday. The length of the Mardi Gras season varies, but it typically lasts anywhere from a month and a half to three months. For a list of future Mardi Gras Day dates, see here. For more information on Mardi Gras basics, see here.

The History of Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras originated in New Orleans the day Iberville stood on our land in 1699. Since then, balls have become a tradition of the season to represent members of society. From the past to the present, Mardi Gras is full of traditions.

Mardi Gras balls began in the 1700s and still exist today. At the Twelfth Night ball, a king cake as cut, and whoever found the bean (today it is a baby not a bean) inside would host the next ball. This would continue until Mardi Gras evening. Numerous balls still exist today, although they are often affiliated with various parades, organizations or krewes. The first ball was held in 1857 by the Mistick Krewe of Comus. Comus hosted the first parade, followed by Rex in 1872, which debuted the king of Mardi Gras. The Rex parade gave Mardi Gras the official colors of purple to represent justice, green to represent faith and gold to represent power. The three colors were to represent the “king”.

In 1872, the city of New Orleans was struggling through years of reconstruction. To help the city and promote tourism, proclamations of Mardi Gras were posted at train stations throughout the country. Rex commanded his subjects to gather and celebrate Carnaval in New Orleans. From there on, Mardi Gras became a sought after tourist attraction.

For more in depth information on Mardi Gras history and traditions, see here. You can visit many Mardi Gras museums year-round as well.

What is Lundi Gras?

Lundi Gras means Fat Monday in French. It is the day before Mardi Gras day. Some parades roll that night, including Proteus and Orpheus, while the day is often filled with festive lunches and celebrations, including the wonderfully creative Red Beans Parade. Zulu and Rex historically meet on this day as well and host various celebrations.


The Ultimate Mardi Gras Guide

Mardi Gras means Fat Tuesday in French, and represents the season of Carnival celebration. Every year, Mardi Gras begins on Twelfth Night, which is January 6th. Twelfth Night represents the Christian holy day of the Epiphany. The season, which represents a time of celebration before Christian Lent, lasts until Fat Tuesday. The length of the Mardi Gras season varies, but it typically lasts anywhere from a month and a half to three months. For a list of future Mardi Gras Day dates, see here. For more information on Mardi Gras basics, see here.

The History of Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras originated in New Orleans the day Iberville stood on our land in 1699. Since then, balls have become a tradition of the season to represent members of society. From the past to the present, Mardi Gras is full of traditions.

Mardi Gras balls began in the 1700s and still exist today. At the Twelfth Night ball, a king cake as cut, and whoever found the bean (today it is a baby not a bean) inside would host the next ball. This would continue until Mardi Gras evening. Numerous balls still exist today, although they are often affiliated with various parades, organizations or krewes. The first ball was held in 1857 by the Mistick Krewe of Comus. Comus hosted the first parade, followed by Rex in 1872, which debuted the king of Mardi Gras. The Rex parade gave Mardi Gras the official colors of purple to represent justice, green to represent faith and gold to represent power. The three colors were to represent the “king”.

In 1872, the city of New Orleans was struggling through years of reconstruction. To help the city and promote tourism, proclamations of Mardi Gras were posted at train stations throughout the country. Rex commanded his subjects to gather and celebrate Carnaval in New Orleans. From there on, Mardi Gras became a sought after tourist attraction.

For more in depth information on Mardi Gras history and traditions, see here. You can visit many Mardi Gras museums year-round as well.

What is Lundi Gras?

Lundi Gras means Fat Monday in French. It is the day before Mardi Gras day. Some parades roll that night, including Proteus and Orpheus, while the day is often filled with festive lunches and celebrations, including the wonderfully creative Red Beans Parade. Zulu and Rex historically meet on this day as well and host various celebrations.


The Ultimate Mardi Gras Guide

Mardi Gras means Fat Tuesday in French, and represents the season of Carnival celebration. Every year, Mardi Gras begins on Twelfth Night, which is January 6th. Twelfth Night represents the Christian holy day of the Epiphany. The season, which represents a time of celebration before Christian Lent, lasts until Fat Tuesday. The length of the Mardi Gras season varies, but it typically lasts anywhere from a month and a half to three months. For a list of future Mardi Gras Day dates, see here. For more information on Mardi Gras basics, see here.

The History of Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras originated in New Orleans the day Iberville stood on our land in 1699. Since then, balls have become a tradition of the season to represent members of society. From the past to the present, Mardi Gras is full of traditions.

Mardi Gras balls began in the 1700s and still exist today. At the Twelfth Night ball, a king cake as cut, and whoever found the bean (today it is a baby not a bean) inside would host the next ball. This would continue until Mardi Gras evening. Numerous balls still exist today, although they are often affiliated with various parades, organizations or krewes. The first ball was held in 1857 by the Mistick Krewe of Comus. Comus hosted the first parade, followed by Rex in 1872, which debuted the king of Mardi Gras. The Rex parade gave Mardi Gras the official colors of purple to represent justice, green to represent faith and gold to represent power. The three colors were to represent the “king”.

In 1872, the city of New Orleans was struggling through years of reconstruction. To help the city and promote tourism, proclamations of Mardi Gras were posted at train stations throughout the country. Rex commanded his subjects to gather and celebrate Carnaval in New Orleans. From there on, Mardi Gras became a sought after tourist attraction.

For more in depth information on Mardi Gras history and traditions, see here. You can visit many Mardi Gras museums year-round as well.

What is Lundi Gras?

Lundi Gras means Fat Monday in French. It is the day before Mardi Gras day. Some parades roll that night, including Proteus and Orpheus, while the day is often filled with festive lunches and celebrations, including the wonderfully creative Red Beans Parade. Zulu and Rex historically meet on this day as well and host various celebrations.


The Ultimate Mardi Gras Guide

Mardi Gras means Fat Tuesday in French, and represents the season of Carnival celebration. Every year, Mardi Gras begins on Twelfth Night, which is January 6th. Twelfth Night represents the Christian holy day of the Epiphany. The season, which represents a time of celebration before Christian Lent, lasts until Fat Tuesday. The length of the Mardi Gras season varies, but it typically lasts anywhere from a month and a half to three months. For a list of future Mardi Gras Day dates, see here. For more information on Mardi Gras basics, see here.

The History of Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras originated in New Orleans the day Iberville stood on our land in 1699. Since then, balls have become a tradition of the season to represent members of society. From the past to the present, Mardi Gras is full of traditions.

Mardi Gras balls began in the 1700s and still exist today. At the Twelfth Night ball, a king cake as cut, and whoever found the bean (today it is a baby not a bean) inside would host the next ball. This would continue until Mardi Gras evening. Numerous balls still exist today, although they are often affiliated with various parades, organizations or krewes. The first ball was held in 1857 by the Mistick Krewe of Comus. Comus hosted the first parade, followed by Rex in 1872, which debuted the king of Mardi Gras. The Rex parade gave Mardi Gras the official colors of purple to represent justice, green to represent faith and gold to represent power. The three colors were to represent the “king”.

In 1872, the city of New Orleans was struggling through years of reconstruction. To help the city and promote tourism, proclamations of Mardi Gras were posted at train stations throughout the country. Rex commanded his subjects to gather and celebrate Carnaval in New Orleans. From there on, Mardi Gras became a sought after tourist attraction.

For more in depth information on Mardi Gras history and traditions, see here. You can visit many Mardi Gras museums year-round as well.

What is Lundi Gras?

Lundi Gras means Fat Monday in French. It is the day before Mardi Gras day. Some parades roll that night, including Proteus and Orpheus, while the day is often filled with festive lunches and celebrations, including the wonderfully creative Red Beans Parade. Zulu and Rex historically meet on this day as well and host various celebrations.


The Ultimate Mardi Gras Guide

Mardi Gras means Fat Tuesday in French, and represents the season of Carnival celebration. Every year, Mardi Gras begins on Twelfth Night, which is January 6th. Twelfth Night represents the Christian holy day of the Epiphany. The season, which represents a time of celebration before Christian Lent, lasts until Fat Tuesday. The length of the Mardi Gras season varies, but it typically lasts anywhere from a month and a half to three months. For a list of future Mardi Gras Day dates, see here. For more information on Mardi Gras basics, see here.

The History of Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras originated in New Orleans the day Iberville stood on our land in 1699. Since then, balls have become a tradition of the season to represent members of society. From the past to the present, Mardi Gras is full of traditions.

Mardi Gras balls began in the 1700s and still exist today. At the Twelfth Night ball, a king cake as cut, and whoever found the bean (today it is a baby not a bean) inside would host the next ball. This would continue until Mardi Gras evening. Numerous balls still exist today, although they are often affiliated with various parades, organizations or krewes. The first ball was held in 1857 by the Mistick Krewe of Comus. Comus hosted the first parade, followed by Rex in 1872, which debuted the king of Mardi Gras. The Rex parade gave Mardi Gras the official colors of purple to represent justice, green to represent faith and gold to represent power. The three colors were to represent the “king”.

In 1872, the city of New Orleans was struggling through years of reconstruction. To help the city and promote tourism, proclamations of Mardi Gras were posted at train stations throughout the country. Rex commanded his subjects to gather and celebrate Carnaval in New Orleans. From there on, Mardi Gras became a sought after tourist attraction.

For more in depth information on Mardi Gras history and traditions, see here. You can visit many Mardi Gras museums year-round as well.

What is Lundi Gras?

Lundi Gras means Fat Monday in French. It is the day before Mardi Gras day. Some parades roll that night, including Proteus and Orpheus, while the day is often filled with festive lunches and celebrations, including the wonderfully creative Red Beans Parade. Zulu and Rex historically meet on this day as well and host various celebrations.


The Ultimate Mardi Gras Guide

Mardi Gras means Fat Tuesday in French, and represents the season of Carnival celebration. Every year, Mardi Gras begins on Twelfth Night, which is January 6th. Twelfth Night represents the Christian holy day of the Epiphany. The season, which represents a time of celebration before Christian Lent, lasts until Fat Tuesday. The length of the Mardi Gras season varies, but it typically lasts anywhere from a month and a half to three months. For a list of future Mardi Gras Day dates, see here. For more information on Mardi Gras basics, see here.

The History of Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras originated in New Orleans the day Iberville stood on our land in 1699. Since then, balls have become a tradition of the season to represent members of society. From the past to the present, Mardi Gras is full of traditions.

Mardi Gras balls began in the 1700s and still exist today. At the Twelfth Night ball, a king cake as cut, and whoever found the bean (today it is a baby not a bean) inside would host the next ball. This would continue until Mardi Gras evening. Numerous balls still exist today, although they are often affiliated with various parades, organizations or krewes. The first ball was held in 1857 by the Mistick Krewe of Comus. Comus hosted the first parade, followed by Rex in 1872, which debuted the king of Mardi Gras. The Rex parade gave Mardi Gras the official colors of purple to represent justice, green to represent faith and gold to represent power. The three colors were to represent the “king”.

In 1872, the city of New Orleans was struggling through years of reconstruction. To help the city and promote tourism, proclamations of Mardi Gras were posted at train stations throughout the country. Rex commanded his subjects to gather and celebrate Carnaval in New Orleans. From there on, Mardi Gras became a sought after tourist attraction.

For more in depth information on Mardi Gras history and traditions, see here. You can visit many Mardi Gras museums year-round as well.

What is Lundi Gras?

Lundi Gras means Fat Monday in French. It is the day before Mardi Gras day. Some parades roll that night, including Proteus and Orpheus, while the day is often filled with festive lunches and celebrations, including the wonderfully creative Red Beans Parade. Zulu and Rex historically meet on this day as well and host various celebrations.


The Ultimate Mardi Gras Guide

Mardi Gras means Fat Tuesday in French, and represents the season of Carnival celebration. Every year, Mardi Gras begins on Twelfth Night, which is January 6th. Twelfth Night represents the Christian holy day of the Epiphany. The season, which represents a time of celebration before Christian Lent, lasts until Fat Tuesday. The length of the Mardi Gras season varies, but it typically lasts anywhere from a month and a half to three months. For a list of future Mardi Gras Day dates, see here. For more information on Mardi Gras basics, see here.

The History of Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras originated in New Orleans the day Iberville stood on our land in 1699. Since then, balls have become a tradition of the season to represent members of society. From the past to the present, Mardi Gras is full of traditions.

Mardi Gras balls began in the 1700s and still exist today. At the Twelfth Night ball, a king cake as cut, and whoever found the bean (today it is a baby not a bean) inside would host the next ball. This would continue until Mardi Gras evening. Numerous balls still exist today, although they are often affiliated with various parades, organizations or krewes. The first ball was held in 1857 by the Mistick Krewe of Comus. Comus hosted the first parade, followed by Rex in 1872, which debuted the king of Mardi Gras. The Rex parade gave Mardi Gras the official colors of purple to represent justice, green to represent faith and gold to represent power. The three colors were to represent the “king”.

In 1872, the city of New Orleans was struggling through years of reconstruction. To help the city and promote tourism, proclamations of Mardi Gras were posted at train stations throughout the country. Rex commanded his subjects to gather and celebrate Carnaval in New Orleans. From there on, Mardi Gras became a sought after tourist attraction.

For more in depth information on Mardi Gras history and traditions, see here. You can visit many Mardi Gras museums year-round as well.

What is Lundi Gras?

Lundi Gras means Fat Monday in French. It is the day before Mardi Gras day. Some parades roll that night, including Proteus and Orpheus, while the day is often filled with festive lunches and celebrations, including the wonderfully creative Red Beans Parade. Zulu and Rex historically meet on this day as well and host various celebrations.


The Ultimate Mardi Gras Guide

Mardi Gras means Fat Tuesday in French, and represents the season of Carnival celebration. Every year, Mardi Gras begins on Twelfth Night, which is January 6th. Twelfth Night represents the Christian holy day of the Epiphany. The season, which represents a time of celebration before Christian Lent, lasts until Fat Tuesday. The length of the Mardi Gras season varies, but it typically lasts anywhere from a month and a half to three months. For a list of future Mardi Gras Day dates, see here. For more information on Mardi Gras basics, see here.

The History of Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras originated in New Orleans the day Iberville stood on our land in 1699. Since then, balls have become a tradition of the season to represent members of society. From the past to the present, Mardi Gras is full of traditions.

Mardi Gras balls began in the 1700s and still exist today. At the Twelfth Night ball, a king cake as cut, and whoever found the bean (today it is a baby not a bean) inside would host the next ball. This would continue until Mardi Gras evening. Numerous balls still exist today, although they are often affiliated with various parades, organizations or krewes. The first ball was held in 1857 by the Mistick Krewe of Comus. Comus hosted the first parade, followed by Rex in 1872, which debuted the king of Mardi Gras. The Rex parade gave Mardi Gras the official colors of purple to represent justice, green to represent faith and gold to represent power. The three colors were to represent the “king”.

In 1872, the city of New Orleans was struggling through years of reconstruction. To help the city and promote tourism, proclamations of Mardi Gras were posted at train stations throughout the country. Rex commanded his subjects to gather and celebrate Carnaval in New Orleans. From there on, Mardi Gras became a sought after tourist attraction.

For more in depth information on Mardi Gras history and traditions, see here. You can visit many Mardi Gras museums year-round as well.

What is Lundi Gras?

Lundi Gras means Fat Monday in French. It is the day before Mardi Gras day. Some parades roll that night, including Proteus and Orpheus, while the day is often filled with festive lunches and celebrations, including the wonderfully creative Red Beans Parade. Zulu and Rex historically meet on this day as well and host various celebrations.


Watch the video: The Meters - Mardi Gras Mambo (October 2022).