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The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge

The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge



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Above the streets of New York City, The Knickerbocker is in the process of creating a rooftop cigar lounge in conjunction with popular tobacconist Nat Sherman as a part of its renovations. Overlooking Times Square, visitors will have an unbeatable view while enjoying some of the finest cigars in the city. Slated to open this autumn, the lounge should become an aficionado's escape in no time.

Photo Courtesy of Nat Sherman

Founded in 1930, Nat Sherman International's cigars have a quality to them as timeless and expertly crafted as The Knickerbocker, making the legendary tobacco producer a perfect fit for the hotel's enduring charm. Curated from the best cigars in the brand's menu, drawing from collections such as Timeless, 1930, and Sterling, each creating a journey through unique richness and flavor.

"Our collaboration with The Knickerbocker Hotel is in complete sync with the Nat Sherman brand and philosophy,” Executive Vice President of Nat Sherman and lineage to the brand William Sherman said. “[The hotel] is an iconic New York building with great history and impeccable style."

Photo Courtesy of Nat Sherman

Guests enjoying the food and cocktails at St. Cloud, the property’s rooftop lounge, can also enjoy pairings recommended by Nat Sherman’s Vice President Michael Herklots. This combination of experts coming together is a rare treat, especially when one includes a tobacconist. It looks like it will help create a truly old-style elegance fused with the comforts of modernity.

As a cigar lover myself, the addition of the cigar lounge makes the hotel a must-visit when I'm in the city. And, in all honesty, swings my hotel choice in favor of the iconic property over most others. It's rare that tobacco gets a shot at the limelight these days, and The Knickerbocker just flooded an incredible brand with the spotlight.


The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge - Recipes

Northwestern Station, Canal and Madison Streets

You could not want a better place in which to eat between trains than the series of dining rooms conducted by Robert and Max Eitel, members of the famous Chicago family of caterers and restaurateurs, in the terminal of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. The main dining room, a dignified elegant place on the second floor, even ranks as one of the important restaurants of the town, for many noted people lunch here from office buildings at the west end of the downtown district. It is one of the favorite eating places of Edward Price Bell, dean of foreign correspondents of the Chicago Daily News and the late Walter Strong, publisher of the same paper always ate here (the Daily News is located across the street from the Northwestern Station) Fred Sargent, president of the Northwestern Railroad Herman Black, publisher of the American and Bill Hay, the popular radio announcer of Station WMAQ. Chris, the head waiter, knows them all and they all know him. No better roast beef can be found anywhere in town than that served here. An expert chef from Munich presides over the kitchens and it is plain that he knows his business. Meals a la carte and table d'hote. Luncheon 75 cents dinner $1.00 and $1.50. Afternoon tea, while waiting for your train, is pleasant on the Terrace. EitePs lunch room, where the same foods are served, is on the first floor of the station and consists of both counter and table service. Many North Shore commuters purchase their bakery goods and pastries at the Eitel Bakery, which adjoins the main floor lunch room. Robert and Max Eitel are brothers of the Eitels who conduct the well-known Bismarck Hotel in the Loop.


FRED HARVEY'S

Oh, my. See?? this was longggggg. Long, but sooo good. I love this culinary tour from the '30s so very much that I just had to share it. I hope you enjoyed the journey as much as I did. :)


Mmmmmm. a bit hungry now. YOU??


See 'ya on the flip side



The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge - Recipes

Northwestern Station, Canal and Madison Streets

You could not want a better place in which to eat between trains than the series of dining rooms conducted by Robert and Max Eitel, members of the famous Chicago family of caterers and restaurateurs, in the terminal of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. The main dining room, a dignified elegant place on the second floor, even ranks as one of the important restaurants of the town, for many noted people lunch here from office buildings at the west end of the downtown district. It is one of the favorite eating places of Edward Price Bell, dean of foreign correspondents of the Chicago Daily News and the late Walter Strong, publisher of the same paper always ate here (the Daily News is located across the street from the Northwestern Station) Fred Sargent, president of the Northwestern Railroad Herman Black, publisher of the American and Bill Hay, the popular radio announcer of Station WMAQ. Chris, the head waiter, knows them all and they all know him. No better roast beef can be found anywhere in town than that served here. An expert chef from Munich presides over the kitchens and it is plain that he knows his business. Meals a la carte and table d'hote. Luncheon 75 cents dinner $1.00 and $1.50. Afternoon tea, while waiting for your train, is pleasant on the Terrace. EitePs lunch room, where the same foods are served, is on the first floor of the station and consists of both counter and table service. Many North Shore commuters purchase their bakery goods and pastries at the Eitel Bakery, which adjoins the main floor lunch room. Robert and Max Eitel are brothers of the Eitels who conduct the well-known Bismarck Hotel in the Loop.


FRED HARVEY'S

Oh, my. See?? this was longggggg. Long, but sooo good. I love this culinary tour from the '30s so very much that I just had to share it. I hope you enjoyed the journey as much as I did. :)


Mmmmmm. a bit hungry now. YOU??


See 'ya on the flip side



The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge - Recipes

Northwestern Station, Canal and Madison Streets

You could not want a better place in which to eat between trains than the series of dining rooms conducted by Robert and Max Eitel, members of the famous Chicago family of caterers and restaurateurs, in the terminal of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. The main dining room, a dignified elegant place on the second floor, even ranks as one of the important restaurants of the town, for many noted people lunch here from office buildings at the west end of the downtown district. It is one of the favorite eating places of Edward Price Bell, dean of foreign correspondents of the Chicago Daily News and the late Walter Strong, publisher of the same paper always ate here (the Daily News is located across the street from the Northwestern Station) Fred Sargent, president of the Northwestern Railroad Herman Black, publisher of the American and Bill Hay, the popular radio announcer of Station WMAQ. Chris, the head waiter, knows them all and they all know him. No better roast beef can be found anywhere in town than that served here. An expert chef from Munich presides over the kitchens and it is plain that he knows his business. Meals a la carte and table d'hote. Luncheon 75 cents dinner $1.00 and $1.50. Afternoon tea, while waiting for your train, is pleasant on the Terrace. EitePs lunch room, where the same foods are served, is on the first floor of the station and consists of both counter and table service. Many North Shore commuters purchase their bakery goods and pastries at the Eitel Bakery, which adjoins the main floor lunch room. Robert and Max Eitel are brothers of the Eitels who conduct the well-known Bismarck Hotel in the Loop.


FRED HARVEY'S

Oh, my. See?? this was longggggg. Long, but sooo good. I love this culinary tour from the '30s so very much that I just had to share it. I hope you enjoyed the journey as much as I did. :)


Mmmmmm. a bit hungry now. YOU??


See 'ya on the flip side



The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge - Recipes

Northwestern Station, Canal and Madison Streets

You could not want a better place in which to eat between trains than the series of dining rooms conducted by Robert and Max Eitel, members of the famous Chicago family of caterers and restaurateurs, in the terminal of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. The main dining room, a dignified elegant place on the second floor, even ranks as one of the important restaurants of the town, for many noted people lunch here from office buildings at the west end of the downtown district. It is one of the favorite eating places of Edward Price Bell, dean of foreign correspondents of the Chicago Daily News and the late Walter Strong, publisher of the same paper always ate here (the Daily News is located across the street from the Northwestern Station) Fred Sargent, president of the Northwestern Railroad Herman Black, publisher of the American and Bill Hay, the popular radio announcer of Station WMAQ. Chris, the head waiter, knows them all and they all know him. No better roast beef can be found anywhere in town than that served here. An expert chef from Munich presides over the kitchens and it is plain that he knows his business. Meals a la carte and table d'hote. Luncheon 75 cents dinner $1.00 and $1.50. Afternoon tea, while waiting for your train, is pleasant on the Terrace. EitePs lunch room, where the same foods are served, is on the first floor of the station and consists of both counter and table service. Many North Shore commuters purchase their bakery goods and pastries at the Eitel Bakery, which adjoins the main floor lunch room. Robert and Max Eitel are brothers of the Eitels who conduct the well-known Bismarck Hotel in the Loop.


FRED HARVEY'S

Oh, my. See?? this was longggggg. Long, but sooo good. I love this culinary tour from the '30s so very much that I just had to share it. I hope you enjoyed the journey as much as I did. :)


Mmmmmm. a bit hungry now. YOU??


See 'ya on the flip side



The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge - Recipes

Northwestern Station, Canal and Madison Streets

You could not want a better place in which to eat between trains than the series of dining rooms conducted by Robert and Max Eitel, members of the famous Chicago family of caterers and restaurateurs, in the terminal of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. The main dining room, a dignified elegant place on the second floor, even ranks as one of the important restaurants of the town, for many noted people lunch here from office buildings at the west end of the downtown district. It is one of the favorite eating places of Edward Price Bell, dean of foreign correspondents of the Chicago Daily News and the late Walter Strong, publisher of the same paper always ate here (the Daily News is located across the street from the Northwestern Station) Fred Sargent, president of the Northwestern Railroad Herman Black, publisher of the American and Bill Hay, the popular radio announcer of Station WMAQ. Chris, the head waiter, knows them all and they all know him. No better roast beef can be found anywhere in town than that served here. An expert chef from Munich presides over the kitchens and it is plain that he knows his business. Meals a la carte and table d'hote. Luncheon 75 cents dinner $1.00 and $1.50. Afternoon tea, while waiting for your train, is pleasant on the Terrace. EitePs lunch room, where the same foods are served, is on the first floor of the station and consists of both counter and table service. Many North Shore commuters purchase their bakery goods and pastries at the Eitel Bakery, which adjoins the main floor lunch room. Robert and Max Eitel are brothers of the Eitels who conduct the well-known Bismarck Hotel in the Loop.


FRED HARVEY'S

Oh, my. See?? this was longggggg. Long, but sooo good. I love this culinary tour from the '30s so very much that I just had to share it. I hope you enjoyed the journey as much as I did. :)


Mmmmmm. a bit hungry now. YOU??


See 'ya on the flip side



The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge - Recipes

Northwestern Station, Canal and Madison Streets

You could not want a better place in which to eat between trains than the series of dining rooms conducted by Robert and Max Eitel, members of the famous Chicago family of caterers and restaurateurs, in the terminal of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. The main dining room, a dignified elegant place on the second floor, even ranks as one of the important restaurants of the town, for many noted people lunch here from office buildings at the west end of the downtown district. It is one of the favorite eating places of Edward Price Bell, dean of foreign correspondents of the Chicago Daily News and the late Walter Strong, publisher of the same paper always ate here (the Daily News is located across the street from the Northwestern Station) Fred Sargent, president of the Northwestern Railroad Herman Black, publisher of the American and Bill Hay, the popular radio announcer of Station WMAQ. Chris, the head waiter, knows them all and they all know him. No better roast beef can be found anywhere in town than that served here. An expert chef from Munich presides over the kitchens and it is plain that he knows his business. Meals a la carte and table d'hote. Luncheon 75 cents dinner $1.00 and $1.50. Afternoon tea, while waiting for your train, is pleasant on the Terrace. EitePs lunch room, where the same foods are served, is on the first floor of the station and consists of both counter and table service. Many North Shore commuters purchase their bakery goods and pastries at the Eitel Bakery, which adjoins the main floor lunch room. Robert and Max Eitel are brothers of the Eitels who conduct the well-known Bismarck Hotel in the Loop.


FRED HARVEY'S

Oh, my. See?? this was longggggg. Long, but sooo good. I love this culinary tour from the '30s so very much that I just had to share it. I hope you enjoyed the journey as much as I did. :)


Mmmmmm. a bit hungry now. YOU??


See 'ya on the flip side



The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge - Recipes

Northwestern Station, Canal and Madison Streets

You could not want a better place in which to eat between trains than the series of dining rooms conducted by Robert and Max Eitel, members of the famous Chicago family of caterers and restaurateurs, in the terminal of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. The main dining room, a dignified elegant place on the second floor, even ranks as one of the important restaurants of the town, for many noted people lunch here from office buildings at the west end of the downtown district. It is one of the favorite eating places of Edward Price Bell, dean of foreign correspondents of the Chicago Daily News and the late Walter Strong, publisher of the same paper always ate here (the Daily News is located across the street from the Northwestern Station) Fred Sargent, president of the Northwestern Railroad Herman Black, publisher of the American and Bill Hay, the popular radio announcer of Station WMAQ. Chris, the head waiter, knows them all and they all know him. No better roast beef can be found anywhere in town than that served here. An expert chef from Munich presides over the kitchens and it is plain that he knows his business. Meals a la carte and table d'hote. Luncheon 75 cents dinner $1.00 and $1.50. Afternoon tea, while waiting for your train, is pleasant on the Terrace. EitePs lunch room, where the same foods are served, is on the first floor of the station and consists of both counter and table service. Many North Shore commuters purchase their bakery goods and pastries at the Eitel Bakery, which adjoins the main floor lunch room. Robert and Max Eitel are brothers of the Eitels who conduct the well-known Bismarck Hotel in the Loop.


FRED HARVEY'S

Oh, my. See?? this was longggggg. Long, but sooo good. I love this culinary tour from the '30s so very much that I just had to share it. I hope you enjoyed the journey as much as I did. :)


Mmmmmm. a bit hungry now. YOU??


See 'ya on the flip side



The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge - Recipes

Northwestern Station, Canal and Madison Streets

You could not want a better place in which to eat between trains than the series of dining rooms conducted by Robert and Max Eitel, members of the famous Chicago family of caterers and restaurateurs, in the terminal of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. The main dining room, a dignified elegant place on the second floor, even ranks as one of the important restaurants of the town, for many noted people lunch here from office buildings at the west end of the downtown district. It is one of the favorite eating places of Edward Price Bell, dean of foreign correspondents of the Chicago Daily News and the late Walter Strong, publisher of the same paper always ate here (the Daily News is located across the street from the Northwestern Station) Fred Sargent, president of the Northwestern Railroad Herman Black, publisher of the American and Bill Hay, the popular radio announcer of Station WMAQ. Chris, the head waiter, knows them all and they all know him. No better roast beef can be found anywhere in town than that served here. An expert chef from Munich presides over the kitchens and it is plain that he knows his business. Meals a la carte and table d'hote. Luncheon 75 cents dinner $1.00 and $1.50. Afternoon tea, while waiting for your train, is pleasant on the Terrace. EitePs lunch room, where the same foods are served, is on the first floor of the station and consists of both counter and table service. Many North Shore commuters purchase their bakery goods and pastries at the Eitel Bakery, which adjoins the main floor lunch room. Robert and Max Eitel are brothers of the Eitels who conduct the well-known Bismarck Hotel in the Loop.


FRED HARVEY'S

Oh, my. See?? this was longggggg. Long, but sooo good. I love this culinary tour from the '30s so very much that I just had to share it. I hope you enjoyed the journey as much as I did. :)


Mmmmmm. a bit hungry now. YOU??


See 'ya on the flip side



The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge - Recipes

Northwestern Station, Canal and Madison Streets

You could not want a better place in which to eat between trains than the series of dining rooms conducted by Robert and Max Eitel, members of the famous Chicago family of caterers and restaurateurs, in the terminal of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. The main dining room, a dignified elegant place on the second floor, even ranks as one of the important restaurants of the town, for many noted people lunch here from office buildings at the west end of the downtown district. It is one of the favorite eating places of Edward Price Bell, dean of foreign correspondents of the Chicago Daily News and the late Walter Strong, publisher of the same paper always ate here (the Daily News is located across the street from the Northwestern Station) Fred Sargent, president of the Northwestern Railroad Herman Black, publisher of the American and Bill Hay, the popular radio announcer of Station WMAQ. Chris, the head waiter, knows them all and they all know him. No better roast beef can be found anywhere in town than that served here. An expert chef from Munich presides over the kitchens and it is plain that he knows his business. Meals a la carte and table d'hote. Luncheon 75 cents dinner $1.00 and $1.50. Afternoon tea, while waiting for your train, is pleasant on the Terrace. EitePs lunch room, where the same foods are served, is on the first floor of the station and consists of both counter and table service. Many North Shore commuters purchase their bakery goods and pastries at the Eitel Bakery, which adjoins the main floor lunch room. Robert and Max Eitel are brothers of the Eitels who conduct the well-known Bismarck Hotel in the Loop.


FRED HARVEY'S

Oh, my. See?? this was longggggg. Long, but sooo good. I love this culinary tour from the '30s so very much that I just had to share it. I hope you enjoyed the journey as much as I did. :)


Mmmmmm. a bit hungry now. YOU??


See 'ya on the flip side



The Knickerbocker Hotel Shows Cigar Aficionados Some Love With Nat Sherman Cigar Lounge - Recipes

Northwestern Station, Canal and Madison Streets

You could not want a better place in which to eat between trains than the series of dining rooms conducted by Robert and Max Eitel, members of the famous Chicago family of caterers and restaurateurs, in the terminal of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. The main dining room, a dignified elegant place on the second floor, even ranks as one of the important restaurants of the town, for many noted people lunch here from office buildings at the west end of the downtown district. It is one of the favorite eating places of Edward Price Bell, dean of foreign correspondents of the Chicago Daily News and the late Walter Strong, publisher of the same paper always ate here (the Daily News is located across the street from the Northwestern Station) Fred Sargent, president of the Northwestern Railroad Herman Black, publisher of the American and Bill Hay, the popular radio announcer of Station WMAQ. Chris, the head waiter, knows them all and they all know him. No better roast beef can be found anywhere in town than that served here. An expert chef from Munich presides over the kitchens and it is plain that he knows his business. Meals a la carte and table d'hote. Luncheon 75 cents dinner $1.00 and $1.50. Afternoon tea, while waiting for your train, is pleasant on the Terrace. EitePs lunch room, where the same foods are served, is on the first floor of the station and consists of both counter and table service. Many North Shore commuters purchase their bakery goods and pastries at the Eitel Bakery, which adjoins the main floor lunch room. Robert and Max Eitel are brothers of the Eitels who conduct the well-known Bismarck Hotel in the Loop.


FRED HARVEY'S

Oh, my. See?? this was longggggg. Long, but sooo good. I love this culinary tour from the '30s so very much that I just had to share it. I hope you enjoyed the journey as much as I did. :)


Mmmmmm. a bit hungry now. YOU??


See 'ya on the flip side



Watch the video: The rooftop at the Knickerbocker Hotel in Times Square, NYC. Pre-Pandemic (August 2022).